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Conference

WingspanSunday, April 19th, 2009 at the Ho-Chee-Nee Chapel on the grounds of the Cherokee Heritage Center, 21192 S. Keeler Road, Park Hill, Oklahoma 74451.

  • 9.00am opening ceremony: Ancient Village council house
  • 9.30am coffee, bagels, and updates on Clemente courses
  • 10.00am Presentation: America Meredith, "Native Art History and the Tribe"
  • 10.45am Presentation: Laura Clark, "Generating Interest with Introduction to Clemente Seminars"
  • 11.30 Presentation: Rachel Jackson, "“Yee P'ay Gyah Maw Tame Aim:
    The Kiowa Clemente Course in the Humanities and Two Ways of Thinking on Poverty”
  • 12:15 lunch
  • 1:30 Board Meeting

Hotel: Best Western Tahlequah 3296 S. Muskogee Ave, Tahlequah,OK (918) 458-1818.

For more information, please email: Rachel Jackson.

Thank you to everyone who participated in our 2008 Native Humanities Teachers Conference in Anadarko, Binger, and Chickasha, Oklahoma from November 20-23, 2008.

The previous conference brochure can be downloaded here. Download the conference schedule.


About Us

Originally named the Pan-American Indian Humanities Center, the organization was renamed to honor our founder, the late Dr. Howard L. Meredith, Cherokee author and head of the American Indian studies department of USAO.

Our group works with indigenous communities in the Americas to create tribally specific humanities courses tailored to the stated needs and desires of those communities. Our goal is to provide practical and financial assistance to teachers, tribes, and institutions of higher learning in sustaining these courses and facilitate communication between different indigenous humanities courses. We hope this conference will bring together Pan-American humanities and indigenous language teachers, students, tribal elders, and other interested parties to facilitate scholarship from native perspectives. We are grateful for the ongoing support of the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma, in Chickasha.

The model for these programs is the Clemente course concept as described in detail in Earl Shorris, Riches for the Poor: The Clemente Course in the Humanities (New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2000). The Clemente concept is a simple idea: that the study of the humanities enables poor people to become fully participating citizens in a democratic society. When this concept was presented to indigenous peoples (C/Yup'ik, Cherokee, Kiowa, and Maya) in their tribal languages with their own histories, reactions from students and tribal communities was positive.

A demand grew for more printing of native language grammar books and treaty primers (by Cherokee and Kiowa), for changes in the presentation of native humanities to school-aged students (by Yup'ik, Náhautl, and Maya), for the addition of new courses (Chickasaw, Musqueam, and Ojibwe), and for the establishment of a center to promote the humanities of indigenous peoples.

Individuals and corporations wishing to support the development of the Meredith Indigenous Humanities center are invited to contact Blue Clark.


Mission Statement

The Meredith Indigenous Humanities Center works with indigenous communities in the Americas to create tribally specific humanities courses tailored to the stated needs and desires of those communities. The MIHC provides practical and financial assistance to teachers, tribes, and institutions of higher learning in sustaining these courses and facilitates communication between different indigenous humanities courses. The MIHC hosts conferences bringing together Pan-American humanities and indigenous language teachers, students, tribal elders, and other interested parties to facilitate scholarship from native perspectives. This is the vision of Dr. Howard L. Meredith.


Vision Statement

Teaching Pan-American indigenous language and humanities to foster participation in tribal and other societies.

 

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Image: "Wingspan," acrylic painting by America Meredith